Advance Health Planning

Advance Care Planning

Advance Care Planning is a process to help you plan your medical care in advance so if you become too unwell to make decisions for yourself, your wishes can still be respected by your health care team, your family and carers.

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Dying to Talk: Discussion Starter

Every day you make decisions. Some are easy… Some are more difficult.

  • Will we have children?
  • When should I retire?
  • How do I want to spend my last days?
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Guide to a social media afterlife

Have you ever thought about what happens to your social media accounts when you die, or wondered what you should do with a loved one’s accounts after they have passed away?

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Bereavement

About Grief

‘I’d never had a serious loss before and I thought grief was basically lots of crying which peaked at the funeral and then you ‘got over it’ and ‘moved on’. I wasn’t prepared for the utter emotional, physical, and mental chaos that it was.

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Grief, Anniversaries & Significant Events

Birthdays, holidays, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, anniversaries, the day they died, the day we met …

For the bereaved, the list of significant events that can trigger grief responses can be endless.

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How to help someone who is grieving

There is no doubt that having the love and support of family and friends is one of the most important ways that grieving people manage personal crises and tragedies. There are many ways you can be supportive and helpful to people you know who are grieving. Your care and support is very important, probably more important than you realise.

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Children and Grief (Ages 5 and under)

Following the death of someone close, parents are often concerned about how to best support and meet the needs of their children. Like adults, children experience, express and process grief in a variety of ways

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Children & Grief (Ages 6-12)

Following the death of someone close, parents are often concerned about how to best support and meet the needs of their children. Like adults, children experience, express and process grief in a variety of ways depending on their age.

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After the loss of a child

No parent expects to outlive their child. It is the news that every parent dreads – news that feels horrible, unnatural, unfair and unbearable.

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Coping with grief at Christmas

Christmas is a time of mixed feelings for those who are missing someone they love. As we gather with family and friends, the absence of a loved one may be felt even more intensely.

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When a parent or close relative is dying

Supporting very young children, when a close relative is seriously ill, can be extremely difficult and people often feel unsure what to say and how best to prepare them.

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How to be a compassionate employer

The Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement, as the largest provider of grief and bereavement education in Australia, works to build the capacity of individuals, organisations and communities in order to enhance wellbeing following adverse life events.

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Bereavement Support standards

Bereavement support standards for specialist palliative care services. Providing bereavement support is an essential component of palliative care service delivery; however, there is currently little evidence-based guidance for health professionals and others providing this support.

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Palliative Care

What is Palliative Care?

Palliative care is care that helps people live their life as fully and as comfortably as possible when living with a life-limiting or terminal disease.

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Palliative Care Myths

Myths & Facts

Myth: Pain is an inevitable part of dying

Fact: Pain can be managed through a number of ways. Pain management is a vital part of palliative care to make sure the patient is not suffering from their condition or symptoms.

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Facts about pain management

Pain is unpleasant sensation, suffering or distress of the body or mind. Pain hurts and it can wear you down, make it hard for you to be active and make you feel tired and tense.

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Facts about Morphine

Opioid medicines are pain relievers. They include medicines such as codeine, morphine and oxycodone. This brochure will help you, your family and your carers learn about using morphine and other opioid medicines for relieving pain. Knowing the facts will help you manage your pain and get on with life.

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The Dying Process

If you have never seen anyone die you may be afraid of what will happen, but the moment of death is usually peaceful. This brochure will help you to understand, anticipate and respond to some of the signs you may notice.

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Carers and End of Life

Palliative Care Australia is the national peak body established by the collective membership of eight state and territory palliative care organisations and the Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine. Together the Palliative Care Australia members network to foster, influence and promote local and national endeavours to realise the vision of quality care at the end of life for all.

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How can I support my friend or family member?

This brochure suggests some strategies for helping someone you know who is living with a terminal condition.

Finding out that someone you know – a relative, acquaintance, workmate, or friend – is going to die comes as a shock. Their world has suddenly changed. Anxiety, sadness and even anger at the news are all quite common reactions.

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Standards for providing Quality Palliative Care

The Council of Palliative Care Australia (PCA) is pleased to provide the health care sector with the fourth edition of Standards for Providing Quality Palliative Care for all Australians.

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Volunteering

National Standards for Volunteer involvement

Volunteer involvement is a critical part of Australian society. It contributes to civil society and active participation in building strong, inclusive, and resilient communities. It underlies innovation and social change, our responses to community need and community challenges, and it brings together and supports the local strengths and assets of communities.

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Palliative Care Volunteer Handbook

One of the goals of Palliative Care is to acknowledge the ‘wholeness’ of the person and to find ways to provide ‘holistic’ care. Volunteers are considered pivotal to this holistic care.

This handbook outlines the roles volunteers play in offering practical, emotional, psychological, and bereavement support within a quality Palliative Care environment.

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